4 Business Problems That You Can Solve with Virtual Hardware and Servers

Physical copies of anything are risky. Older business documents that have been folded away in file folders for years are at risk of everything from a fire to just getting lost. Locally saved filed on a single computer will disappear if the computer gets damaged, corrupted, or stolen. As the business value of a physical asset increases, so do the risks your company faces. Even during daily operations, physical hardware and tools are slowing your business down. Instead of being tied to in-house machines, start looking into virtual alternatives that free up your employees to work at home or on the road. Virtual alternatives also plug your company into the… Read More

An abstract 3D render of a microprocessor on a circuit board with many electrical components installed. The central microprocessor has an integrated security lock in glowing yellow color. virtual hardware components are labelled with random serial numbers, with many connections glowing in yellow color too.

Physical copies of anything are risky. Older business documents that have been folded away in file folders for years are at risk of everything from a fire to just getting lost. Locally saved filed on a single computer will disappear if the computer gets damaged, corrupted, or stolen. As the business value of a physical asset increases, so do the risks your company faces.

Even during daily operations, physical hardware and tools are slowing your business down. Instead of being tied to in-house machines, start looking into virtual alternatives that free up your employees to work at home or on the road. Virtual alternatives also plug your company into the modern updates that dedicated services stay on top of. Solve both equipment constraints that happen in the aftermath of a disaster and daily problems by switching your dedicated physical hardware to virtual ones:

1. Your disaster recovery plan doesn’t solve all of your problems.

Disaster recovery and business continuity plans, which cover two different aspects of a sudden data loss or emergency, don’t keep you running at full efficiency. They just try to minimize downtime and keep basic operations going if possible. Depending on the type of damage done to a physical server, you might be able to recover only part of your customers’ data and recoup only a portion of your continuous operations.

But switching to a virtual server reduces the risk of any problem. Not only is the physical hardware behind your virtual server held in a completely secure environment, it’s not in isolation. At the first sign of problems, all of your virtual machines and processes can be switched to another unit.

2. Your energy bill is too high.

Technology eats into your monthly bills. They need electricity to stay running, fans to stay cool (especially in environments with stacked servers or hardware storage), and constant monitoring systems. But a virtual server only needs virtual monitoring. The physical infrastructure behind your virtual one is also made up of external servers that share space. You can reap the benefits of operating on just a portion of a much larger system than running two or three servers yourself.

3. There is a hard maximum on RAM.

More and more functions are being virtualized. One of the most popular transformations is the growing popularity of virtual, or cloud-based servers, that overcome the limitations of physical servers. But other physical hardware that your business relies upon could also be limiting your company’s growth, too.

If your company’s operating system on a specific device is limited to 16 GB of memory without any reinforcement, there is a cap on how much work that particular machine can do. Not only does this reduce each piece of hardware’s ability to effectively multi-task, it means that analytics and forecasting programs that use a lot of data can’t run on your machines. As data accumulation and more refined projections continue to grow, the programs that power the analysis need more memory. But virtual machines that can take advantage of memory ballooning can share RAM and redistribute resources towards more intensive software. Install virtual machines on a greater aggregate host of RAM to minimize limitations.

4. Physical machines have downtime.

No matter how well you maintain your physical devices, they have some degree of vulnerability to downtime. Laptops and desktops need to be shut down and updated. Servers are occasionally down for maintenance. These are just the predictable and routine downtimes. Physical machines can also suffer damage and overheat. Software coding can also be corrupted over time. If your resources are restricted to physical devices, then they will be offline for some measure of time.

But virtual machines don’t have the same limitation. At the point where any physical hardware needs updates or maintenance, the virtual machines can be transferred to other physical hardware. The same is true for any software or new data caught in an emergency. It’s difficult to fully calculate the cost of downtime even to a small- or mid-sized company. But 24/7 service availability is becoming the status quo. This means that the cost of even planned downtime is growing.

The benefits of going virtual don’t stop there. Go to IT Networks Australia Pty Ltd to see more reasons why businesses have been switching over to virtual hardware infrastructures and managed IT systems for years.


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