Benefits of Virtualization

The benefits of virtualization are obvious: Instead of having just one application per server, you can now run several guest Operating Systems and a handful of applications with the same physical hardware. That’s right, virtualization can bring you so much more for your money! Hardware Independence and VM portability So what enables a virtual machine to be portable across physical machines running the same hypervisor? As said, every virtual machine has its own virtual hardware. So the guest operating system loaded on a VM is only aware of this hardware configuration and not the physical server’s. In other words, a VM is completely hardware independent. It means that the operation… Read More

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Create New Root/Administrator User on VMWare ESX

To add a user to the Users Table. Log in to the host using the vSphere Client, using the root userid. Click the Local Users & Groups tab and click Users. Right-click anywhere in the Users table and click Add to open the Add New User dialog. Enter a login name, a user name, and a password.Note: The vSphere Client automatically assigns the next available UID to the user on the ESX host. You can over-write the populated field. Create a password that meets the length and complexity requirements. However, the ESX host checks for password compliance only if you have switched to the pam_passwdqc.so plug-in for authentication. The password settings in… Read More

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Configuring Raw Disk Mappings in VMWare ESX

To configure a local device as an RDM disk: Open an SSH session to the ESXi/ESX host. List the disks that are attached to the ESXi host, use the command: # ls -l /vmfs/devices/disks From the list, identify the local device you want to configure as an RDM and copy the device name. Note: The device name will likely be prefixed with t10. and look similar to: t10.F405E46494C4540046F455B64787D285941707D203F45765 To configure the device as an RDM and output the RDM pointer file to your chosen destination, run the command: # vmkfstools -z /vmfs/devices/disks/<diskname> /vmfs/volumes/<datastorename>/<vmfolder>/<vmname>.vmdk For Example: # vmkfstools -z /vmfs/devices/disks/t10.F405E46494C4540046F455B64787D285941707D203F45765 /vmfs/volumes/Datastore2/localrdm1/localrdm1.vmdk Note: The size of the newly created RDM pointer file appears… Read More

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